The week of September 7-13 takes us from Lunar Day 20 to Day 25. This week we will highlight the crater Clavius, viewable late Tuesday night.

On Clavius the crater is so large that the curvature of the Moon pushes the floor's central regions into the sunlight first, and the shadows will reveal a floor that is strewn with craterlets.Clavius: [SW/Q8] Sunset over Clavius is something that you don’t want to miss! The crater is so large (140 miles) that the curvature of the Moon pushes the floor’s central regions into the sunlight first, and the shadows will reveal a floor that is strewn Mare Nubium on the moonwith craterlets. There is a delightful arc of small craters, artistically and sequentially arranged in order of size, which begins at Rutherfurd, a 34-mile crater just inside the southeast rim, arcs northward and then diminishes toward the west. While the Sun angle is low over Clavius, look for several ridges that extend like fingers northward Clavius on the moon and the movie 2001from Rutherfurd. The origin of these ridges remains a mystery. Revisit Clavius often. You will always see something that you missed previously.

OF ADDITIONAL INTEREST IN SPACE:

On Saturday, Venus will be 2.5° south of the Beehive Cluster M44 (you’ll need binoculars).

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It is highly recommended that you get a copy of Sky and Telescope’s Field Map of the Moon, the very finest Moon map available for use at the telescope. It is available for $10.95 at www.skyandtelescope.com and on Amazon. All features mentioned in this blog will be keyed to the grid on the Field Map and will look like this: Plato: [NW/D9]

Credits:
Courtesy of Gray Photography of Corpus Christi, Texas
Lunar photos: NASA / USGS / BMDO / LROC / ASU / DLR / LOLA / Moon Globe. Used by permission

Andrew Planck

Andrew Planck

Author and Astronomer Andrew Planck shepherds you to the moon and its mysteries of intrigue and surprise. Learn about the moon’s most fascinating objects, understand how the moon was formed and the names of many of the craters … and why they honor individuals who have changed the course of history.
Andrew Planck
Sunset Over Clavius is a Don’t Miss Event

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